The Alien has found yet another platform to continue his abuse

 

 

 

I have recently been informed of the new Social Media Platform where the Alien aka Christopher John Hobby is continuing his abuse against others, as far as I am aware nobody except his very much estranged brother is reading anything he is writing, although his brother is reading him from a twitter account @RonnieAndMissy  and the Alien is gabbing from his gab account I have to come to the conclusion that they are stalking each other.

The Alien seems to be obsessed with the Mr Men

He has gone on to make a few new ones of his own

 

 

 

 

whilst he remains

Very few of us have any difficulty recognising that crying conveys hurt. But far fewer of us realise that getting mad—as a reaction to some perceived threat, insult, or injustice—is a desperate attempt to cover up that hurt. And in kids that inflamed emotional state is far less likely to be rationally articulated than exaggeratedly “acted out.” And, guess what? It’s pretty much the same with adults, too,  when our buttons get pushed, when another person makes us feel threatened—especially someone we’re intimately connected to and so emotionally depend on, like our partner—we betray a strong tendency to instantly regress into our reactive child self. Sure, we may do so with somewhat more reserve and sophistication. But we’re hardly dissimilar from children when we sulk, withdraw, rush to defend ourself—or raise our voice and fervently go into blaming (or perhaps counter-blaming) mode.

However unconsciously, most of us have discovered that our most potent defence is a strong offence. Consequently, when we feel denied or accused, we’re likely to block off our lurking fears, insecurities, and self-doubts by turning them back on our adversary. Which is the reason so many of us get mad—or even “lose it”—when our partner begins to make us question ourselves.

So when we’re distraught, when we let our emotions get the better of us, we really haven’t evolved much beyond childhood. Just like kids unable to count the cost of their acting out behaviours, our own pained reactions prompt us to respond to the one who hurt us in ways likely only to further harm the relationship. In a word, our incited reactions are counter-productive. For in the moment we’re driven by a deeply felt need to hurt the other back.  Is that what is really going on here??

Think about it. Expressing our anger toward another has a condescending quality to it. It’s demeaning (mostly in reaction to our feeling demeaned ourselves). Moreover, it enables us to experience not only a certain moral superiority over the other, but a renewed sense of power over them as well. Quite literally, our “fight” (vs. “flight”) reaction toward them pumps up our adrenaline supplies. Our organism now “fortified,” we’re able to feel back in control of the situation—though the reality of our actually getting back in the driver’s seat is far more illusory than real

My advice to both of you is seek help, you are both making fools of yourselves.  Remember it takes a big person to walk away, this is a battle that neither of you will win, but if you carry on, you both stand a lot more to lose.

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